IRES Seminar Series

The IRES Seminar Series showcases the research of our graduate students, faculty and guests. There are also monthly professional development seminars. Our seminars are open to everyone.

The seminars run every Thursday during the Winter Session (September to April) from 12:30pm to 1:30pm.

Winter 2021/2022 Seminars will be held in the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory Theatre (AERL Room 120), at 2202 Main Mall.

We are trying to provide Zoom links for those who can’t join us in person. Please email bonnie.leung@ubc.ca for the Zoom link.

Select seminar videos are available for viewing here.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

December 2, 2021: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Leroy Little Bear


December 2, 2021: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Leroy Little Bear Read More

November 25, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Naoko Ellis


We understand that for technological advancements to become solutions impacting society positively, various non-technical aspects must be in place. How do we then train engineers to become solution providers who understand the complexity of society? How are boundaries of engineering manifested? These questions have led me to join IRES last year, and continue working towards climate emergency through transdisciplinary research. Read More

November 18, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Yeonuk Kim and Helina Jolly


November 18, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Yeonuk Kim and Helina Jolly Read More

October 21, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Don Carruthers Den Hoed


This presentation will outline the history and core programs of CPCIL and share opportunities for the academic community to get involved with real-world wicked problems, such as decolonizing parks, equity and diversity, conservation burnout, climate adaptation, and organizational sustainability – particularly tensions in financing protected areas. Read More

October 14, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Jack Durant and Alexa Tanner


October 14, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Jack Durant and Alexa Tanner Read More

October 7, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Edward Gregr


Understanding the distribution of species and the services they provide is critical to effective resource management. This understanding typically relies correlations between observations of species and the environment. Read More

September 23, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Rachel White and Simon Donner


The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change. The IPCC provides regular assessments of the scientific basis of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and options for adaptation and mitigation. Join us on September 23 for a roundtable discussion on the 2021 IPCC Report with Dr. White and Dr. Donner. Read More

September 16, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Erika Luna and Claire Ewing


September 16, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Erika Luna and Claire Ewing. Read More

IRES Seminar Series Resumes Thursday, September 16, 2021


See you all on September 16, 2021! (Photo by Garrett Parker on Unsplash) Read More

April 15, 2021: IRES Student Symposium


The IRES Student Symposium features various RES graduate students presenting their research. Read More

April 8, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Erle Ellis


Global evidence confirms that human societies have gained the capacity to transform our entire planet. Could this unprecedented capacity be redirected to shape a better future for both people and the rest of nature? This presentation explores the possibility that some of the same social processes that have transformed this planet for the worse could also transform it for the better. Read More

April 1, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Sonja Klinsky


In this talk, Dr. Klinsky will discuss how approaching climate (in)justice through the lens of relationships can be a productive way to orient engaged scholarship in the climate justice context.  Read More

March 25, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Gordon Christie


While Indigenous peoples across Canada engage in struggles over lands and waters, other battles rage in less visible forms.  Academics analyzing events argue about what led to this world of conflict and about how to resolve tensions. Read More

March 18, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Madison Stevens and Rocío López de la Lama


March 18, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Madison Stevens and Rocío López de la Lama Read More

March 11, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Erika Zavaleta


The practice of conservation science includes what we choose to study towards what goals, as well as whom we choose to work with, how we influence our organizations, and how we use science to hone our teaching and to advance justice in our field. Read More

March 4, 2021: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Helina Jolly, Simon Donner, and Mark Cembrowski


This seminar hopes to bring together perspectives from people at different career stages within academia, and kick-start conversations around expectations, limitations, and strategies to strive for.  Read More

February 25, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Andrew Baron


Implicit bias has many pernicious effects on behavior including affecting hiring and voting decisions, and even treatment recommendations by medical professionals. Moreover, research shows that this form of bias is notoriously difficult to change in adults, underscoring the need to identify its roots in development. Read More

February 18, 2021: No Seminar Due to Mid-Term Break


There will be no seminar on Thursday, February 18 due to Mid-Term Break (February 15-19). Read More

February 11, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Joanne Nelson and Kyoko Adachi


February 11, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Joanne Nelson and Kyoko Adachi Read More

February 4, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Mary Collins


Analyzing the relationship between employment and toxic emissions at over 25,000 US manufacturing facilities between 1998 to 2012 demonstrates that significant reductions in toxic pollution can be achieved while avoiding equivalent effects on employment. Read More

January 28, 2021: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Zia Mehrabi


What makes a good researcher? A few months back, I led a short workshop at the Land Use and Global Environment Laboratory on this topic. One of the PhD students thought that other Masters/PhD students at IRES would benefit from me running the same workshop for the wider grad student body. So here you are. Come along to explore what makes a good researcher. Read More

January 21, 2021: IRES Faculty Seminar with Fausto Sarmiento


As archetypes of the meta-geography of the vertical dimension, mountain metaphors remain at the core of animistic belief systems, religious cults, military strategies, economic potential and scientific innovation. Dr. Sarmiento argue that transdisciplinary science and geocritical tropes, incorporating physical, human, and technical geography with humanities and arts, are the best approaches to understand the complexity of mountain systems. Read More

January 14, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Sandeep Pai and Ian Theaker (First Seminar in Term 2)


January 14, 2021: IRES Student Seminar with Sandeep Pai and Ian Theaker (First Seminar in Term 2) Read More

December 3, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Inês Azevedo (Last Seminar in Term 1)


In this talk I will cover three related recent papers: 1) Comparing the Health Damages from Air Pollution to the Value Added in the U.S. Economy (PNAS, 2019). 2) Fine Particulate Air Pollution from Electricity Generation in the US: Health Impacts by Race, Income, and Geography (ES&T, 2019). 3) What are the best combinations of fuel-vehicle technologies to mitigate climate change and air pollution effects across the United States? (ERL, 2020). Read More

November 26, 2020: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Cicely Blain


November 26, 2020: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Cicely Blain Read More

November 19, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Felix Pretis


Using machine learning and econometric model selection, we construct an empirically-derived climate damage function allowing for the potential impact of climate extremes and accounting for possible adaptation pathways. The damage function can be disaggregated to a country level as a function of global mean surface temperature and is independent of any specific emission scenario Read More

November 12, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Scott McKenzie and Nima Jamshidi


November 12, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Scott McKenzie and Nima Jamshidi Read More

November 5, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Claire Kim


Interview with Dr. Claire Kim: Race and Human-Animal Relations Read More

October 29, 2020: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Baruch Fischhoff


The talk will address opportunities for integrating research and public service by creating empirically based communications responsive to user needs. It will draw examples from a diverse application areas. Read More

October 22, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Juno Salazar Parreñas


The COVID-19 pandemic has starkly demonstrated the depth of social inequalities in North America, leading to an agitated summer of 2020 that has been characterized by popular uprising and growing support of social movements for Black Lives Matter and prison abolition. Universities have joined in on antiracist language, declaring statements against racism, violence, and white supremacy. Are these recent efforts an example of the decolonization of institutions or might they serve as examples of the institutionalization of decolonization? Considering past efforts to decolonize higher education and a colonial-era ethnological and ethological museum, this talk considers the pitfalls of ambiguity between aspirations for transformation on one hand and the cynicism of merely symbolic gestures on the other. Read More

October 15, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Balsher Sidhu and Luis Felipe Melgarejo Perez


October 15, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Balsher Sidhu and Luis Felipe Melgarejo Perez Read More

October 8, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with César Rodríguez-Garavito


Climate litigation based on human rights is proliferating around the world. From the Netherlands to Mexico, from Canada to South Africa to the Philippines, from the Arctic to the Amazon, from domestic to international courts, litigants are bringing legal challenges against governments and corporations to hold them accountable for massive human rights violations associated with global warming. This talk presents the first systematic study of the universe of rights-based climate litigation around the world. The talk discusses the origins and the emergent legal doctrines as well as the  impact and limitations of rights-based litigation in advancing climate action.    Read More

October 1, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Anthony Persaud and Ilana Judah


October 1, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Anthony Persaud and Ilana Judah Read More

September 24, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Areef Abraham


Areef has worked for over three decades with underserved communities who struggle to pay their energy bills. This presentation will discuss how and why it all began, and the successes and pitfalls he experienced along the way. Areef’s learned experience speaks to the importance of working effectively at the interface of communities, governments and tradespeople to improve outcomes for all. Read More

September 17, 2020: IRES Faculty Roundtable with Milind Kandlikar, David Boyd, and Claire Kremen


In March and April of 2020 as COVID-19 lockdowns were put in place around the world, observers noticed a palpable change in environmental conditions. As economic activity and movement of people stalled environmental quality improved. For example, air quality in places with notoriously bad levels of pollution became a lot better, observations of animal and bird life went up, and emissions of carbon dropped. However, six months into the pandemic we seem to be back to where we were in early 2020. This panel will address what we have learnt from this episode, and whether it provides lessons for a longer term transition to improved environmental and human health protection, including: the relationship between emerging infectious diseases, wildlife trade and deforestation, and the importance of actions to prevent future pandemics; how the covid 19 reveals the many frailties of our food system; and the future implications of CoVID for air quality and climate change. Read More

September 10, 2020: IRES Awards Session with Kai Chan (First Seminar in Term 1)


Want to write an application that you’ll be proud of for an NSERC or SSHRC master’s or doctoral award? Nervous about crafting a research proposal that will make your application stand out? Join this Awards Info Session and kick-start the writing process with some great tips and direction for creating a successful application. Read More

March 12, 2020: IRES Student Seminar with Helina Jolly


Gidiku Vapathu is an ethnographic research documentary about the Indigenous Kattunayakan (Nayaka) people of India. In Kattunyakan language, ‘Gidiku Vapathu’ means 'Going to the forest' (Gidiku - Forest; Vapathu - Going). A term commonly used by the community members to invite their friends and family as they start their daily walk into the forest. Read More

March 5, 2020: IRES Professional Development Seminar with Tom Hetherington


People from all walks to life are struggling to cope with the emotional impact of the climate crisis. In this Professional Development Seminar, Tom will share strategies and supports from the “From Climate Grief to Acton (FCGA)” group for dealing with feelings associated with eco-grief and/or climate anxiety, including non-judgmental personal storytelling, building communities of mutual support, mindfulness exercises, and self-empowering action planning. Read More

February 27, 2020: IRES Faculty Seminar with Jiaying Zhao


A growing body of research suggests that direct cash transfers are an effective solution to reduce global poverty, although most evidence comes from developing countries. The current study is the first randomized control trial in developed countries examining the impact of unconditional cash transfers on homeless individuals. Specifically, we distributed a one-time unconditional cash grant of $7,500 to each of 50 homeless individuals in Vancouver, with another group as controls. Our preliminary data show that the cash transfer results in significant improvements in housing stability, food security, savings, and cognitive function, with no increases in spending on temptation goods. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, the cash transfer results in net savings per person per month via reduced shelter use. Our preliminary findings suggest that unconditional cash transfers can be an effective and cost-effective solution to reduce homelessness in developed countries. Read More

February 20, 2020: No Seminar Due to Reading Week


There will be no seminar on Thursday, February 20 due to Reading Break (Feb 18-21). Read More