Adjunct Professors

Adjunct Professor

Christian Beaudrie is a Decision Analyst with Compass Resource Management in Vancouver, BC. He specializes in risk and decision analysis, Structured Decision Making (SDM), risk governance, and stakeholder engagement, particularly in fields related to emerging technologies, pollution and toxics, climate change, and environmental management. His work focuses on the development of decision support tools and adaptive management programs, analytics and modelling, and the use of expert judgment elicitation techniques to help municipal, provincial, and federal governments make informed decisions towards reducing health and environmental risk.
Christian’s research explores life-cycle risks and regulation for emerging technologies, alternative (non-animal) test strategies for assessing chemical and nanomaterial risks, strategies for assessment and communication of sea-level rise and coastal flood risks, expert and lay perceptions of risk, and the use of expert judgment in decision making under high uncertainty. Christian holds an interdisciplinary PhD from the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC, an MEng in Biomedical Engineering from McGill University, and a BASc in Biochemical and Environmental Engineering and BSc in Biology from the University of Western Ontario.

Adjunct Professor

Steve joins the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability from Simon Fraser University where he was the Associate Director of the Pacific Water Research Centre and chair of the REM Water Research group. His research interests focuses on the coupling of social and engineering sciences to inform decision making and policymaking within a water and energy management context. This incorporates the water-energy nexus, water and energy utility planning and operations, distributed water and energy systems, decision support for climate change adaptation, behavioural models of individual choices affecting water and energy use, and coupled socio-hydrological and system dynamic modelling.

Steve has worked for over 20 years with the municipal water and energy sector. He has consulted with numerous municipalities in North America, Australia and the United Kingdom and currently sits on the Board of Directors for the American Water Works Association representing the BC Section. Steve also co-chairs the BC Water and Waste Association’s risk and resiliency committee is a member of BCWWA’s leadership council. Steve holds a PhD in Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University, a MSc in Environmental Technology Management from Arizona State University, and a BSc in Psychology and BSc in Engineering from the University of Arizona.

Adjunct Professor

Shashi Enarth is a development activist from India, struggling to strike a balance between academia and praxis. Starting his career as a community organizer, he has worked with low income segments of the population, particularly with farming communities in India, Nigeria and Tanzania. His area of interest is: building community-based self-governing people’s institutions that can safeguard the interests of its members through sustainable and equitable use of all forms of capital, especially natural and human resources. A good part of his 25 year development career saw him struggle with implementation of development policies that mandated decentralization of fiscal, administrative and political powers against a backdrop of a political economy that is shaped by traditional institutions and forces of centralization. In the process, he got involved in policy research and advocacy initiatives through NGOs in India and as a consultant to The World Bank in Africa. His current research interests, therefore, focusses on understanding barriers to equity and sustainability in the geo-political context of developing economies. Before taking the current sabbatical, he was a senior member of BASIX Social Enterprise Group, an Indian conglomeration of 15 organizations working on a mission to promote large scale sustainable livelihoods.

Shashi is a trained social worker who returned to school to do a PhD that explored the relationship between the processes of decentralization and democratization and its impact on good governance. He is an IRES/UBC Alumni, during the days of RMES!

Adjunct Professor

Brian Gouge is a Research Scientist at Aquatic Informatics and an Adjunct Professor at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Victoria and a PhD in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia. His interests are at the intersection of information technology, the environment, human health, and decision making.  Brian’s current projects focus on environmental informatics and decision making, and involve information modeling, analytics, optimization, uncertainty quantification, and software engineering.  Previous projects have included modeling of the environmental and human health impacts of air pollution from transit buses and vehicle scheduling optimization aimed at reducing these adverse impacts.

 

Adjunct Professor

Robin Gregory is Senior Research Scientist with Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon and Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. He works on problems of policy and risk analysis, stakeholder consultation, environmental and adaptive management, prevention of genocide and mass atrocities, choice under uncertainty, and community and indigenous health assessment. Clients include government departments in the US and Canada, international organizations, NGOs, and a variety of programs and agencies interesting in improving the decision-making skills of their members. His research and applied work emphasizes collaborative decision-aiding approaches that help participants to understand their own and others’ responses to the consequences of actions characterized by multiple dimensions, substantial uncertainty, and often controversy. In such cases, defensible choices need to be made across different options; the use of structured decision methods can serve as the basis for generating better alternatives and for creating more broadly accepted options.  Robin has written and consulted extensively on the subject of informing public policy choices and is first author of the book “Structured Decision Making: A Practical Guide to Environmental Management Choices” (Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2012).  He has a BA in Economics from Yale University, an MA from the University of British Columbia in Natural Resources Management, and an interdisciplinary PhD from UBC in Psychology, Ecology, and Economics.

Phone: 604-747-1866; Email: robin.gregory@ires.ubc.ca

Adjunct Professor

I recently completed my PhD with Dr. Chan at IRES, studying the sea otter – kelp forest trophic cascade and the associated changes in ecosystem services. This interdisciplinary work compliments my earlier academic training in Zoology (M.Sc. 2000) and Computer Science (B.Sc. 1992), which is reflected in my over 25 years of experience in field research design and sampling, research, consulting, and project management. I consider myself a Systems Ecologist studying the intersection of ecosystem services, risk, and human values. My research interests centre on using various types of spatial models to inform ecosystem-based management, and on making such models more credible, relevant, and legitimate. Understanding model uncertainty is the foundation of model credibility, and to that end, I am exploring ways of making models more credible through the explicit consideration of model assumptions. To be effective, model results must also be relevant to managers, and perceived as legitimate by stakeholders. These goals are most likely to be achieved if model objectives and scope are defined collaboratively with interested managers and vested stakeholders. I am actively pursuing opportunities to build such models in contentious and complex social-ecological contexts.

Adjunct Professor

Scott has a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of British Columbia and held a post-doctoral position in the Department of Zoology at Oxford. He works to help business improve their sustainability by quantifying and managing corporate risk and developing performance metrics. Scott serves as an advisor on sustainability initiatives to the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. He also served as a Liaison Delegate to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development – a global, C.E.O.-led coalition of some 200 of the world’s leading companies advocating for progress on sustainable development. He was the lead author for Chapter 2 in the United Nations book: The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity in Business and Enterprise, and he was co-editor of the book, Conservation Biology Principles for Forested Landscapes.

Adjunct Professor

Colin Levings is a Scientist Emeritus at the DFO-UBC Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research in West Vancouver, British Columbia. He has a B Sc and M Sc in Zoology and Fisheries from UBC and a Ph D in Biological Oceanography from Dalhousie University. His research interests are in the areas of estuarine ecology of salmonids, aquatic invasive species, environmental aspects of aquaculture, estuarine habitat restoration, and food web ecology, among others. He has co-supervised graduate students at UBC working on a range of aquatic ecosystem problems and collaborated with overseas colleagues on estuarine studies in Norway, Japan, and Korea. Colin has been a member of several scientific advisory boards dealing with fish habitat management issues in BC and the northwest Pacific States, has served as an editor to a number of journals, and is a founding member of the Pacific Estuarine Research Society. He has published about 200 papers, conference proceeding, reports and other communications.

 

Adjunct Professor

Cathryn Clarke Murray is a Visiting Scientist with the PICES North Pacific Marine Science Organization and Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC. She is a marine ecologist broadly interested in the interaction of human and natural systems. Cathryn has a PhD in biological oceanography from UBC and an MSc from James Cook University in Australia. She has conducted interdisciplinary research on the ecology of invasive species, the cumulative effect of human activities, ecological risk assessment, and studied the introduction and spread of invasive species on recreational boats. Cathryn is currently conducting research on the impact of tsunami debris on coastal ecosystems.

Adjunct Professor
Robin is a research scientist with World Wildlife Fund (US) and currently an Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC. He is hosted by Professor Kai Chan and is interested in ecosystem services, conservation economics, and wildlife ecology.

Adjunct Professor

Babak Pourbohloul is trained as a theoretical physicist (PhD in complex systems and chaos theory) and has been a faculty member at the University of British Columbia since 2004. He was the founding Director of the Division of Mathematical Modeling at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (2001 – 2016) and the founding Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Complexity Science for Health Systems (2013 – 2017). He has been the Lead Investigator of several international mathematical modeling projects in the development and application of novel quantitative methods in public- and global health systems policy design.

With more than 18 years of experience working in both academic and policymaking environments, Babak leads consulting projects for several national and international authorities and enterprises. He aims to develop and employ methods of complex systems analysis, through multidisciplinary collaborations, to optimize policy design to achieve the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 2030), at the local, national and international levels. His main areas of interest include public- and global health policy design, econophysics and systemic risk analysis, complex networks analysis and nonlinear dynamics

 

Adjunct Professor

Conor Reynolds has an interdisciplinary PhD in Resource Management and Environmental Studies, and a Master’s in Mechanical Engineering, both from UBC. He is currently part of the Air Quality & Environment team at Metro Vancouver, the regional government that delivers services, policy and political leadership on behalf of 23 local authorities. Conor’s work is primarily related to energy and climate change, in particular projects to measure, reduce and offset greenhouse gas emissions in Metro Vancouver’s corporate operations. In addition, he works on the topic of managing air pollutant emissions from mobile sources in the region, as part of the implementation of Metro Vancouver’s Integrated Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Management Plan. He is interested in interdisciplinary, policy-relevant research on the environmental and human health impacts of energy use in society; active transportation; and the smart use of energy technologies.

Conor’s publications can be viewed here.

Adjunct Professor

Arvind works as the Head of Air Quality Section (Assessments) at the BC Ministry of Environment and an Adjunct Professor at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. In his current role at the Ministry of Environment, Arvind leads the section responsible for the review of air discharge applications under the Environmental Management Act (EMA) and the Environmental Assessment Act (EAA), and is also a statutory decision maker under EMA. Arvind’s team is responsible for making recommendations on permitting of air discharges, publishing regional air quality reports, leading airshed planning activities and issuing air quality advisories. In his previous role as the Head of Environmental Management Section (Omineca-Peace), Arvind led regional permitting and compliance activities for oil and gas, forest and municipal sectors.

Arvind is a professional engineer with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India and a PhD in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Arvind’s research interests include modeling small-area variations in concentrations of urban air pollutants, development of novel methods for estimating population exposure and air quality impact assessment for major industrial sources. Arvind has published his research in important scientific journals like Environmental Science and Technology and Transportation Research Part-F.

Adjunct Professor

Raffaele Vignola has a PhD from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) and is the Director of the Latin American Chair of Environmental Decisions for Global Change (CLADA) at CATIE. He is leading the design and implementation of research and action-research projects in Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Panama, Guatemala focusing on the planning and implementation of land use based adaptation responses to soil and water stresses caused by climate change and societal development paths. He has published research articles and books chapters drawing from an experience of more than ten years in applied research on the human dimension of land use based responses to climate change in Latin America (for more information on The Latin American Chair of Environmental Decisions click here).

Adjunct Professor

Rebecca Witter is an Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. An environmental anthropologist by training (University of Georgia, 2010), her interests and expertise span the human dimensions of environment and include:  the relationships between rights and environment; global environmental politics and decision-making; land, tree, and resource tenure; human-wildlife conflict and other multi-species relations; human mobility, displacement and resettlement; and landscape history. She has conducted ethnographic, interdisciplinary, and collaborative research in Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia, Brazil, Japan, and the United States. She has received funding from the American Association of University Women, Fulbright Institute of International Education, National Science Foundation, Social Science and Humanities Resource Council, Swedish Research Council, World Agroforestry Center, and Transboundary Protected Areas Research Initiative. Witter has published in Conservation Biology, Conservation and Society, Global Environmental Change, Journal of Sustainable Forestry, Policy Matters, and Source.

In collaboration with her advisor, Terre Satterfield, Witter’s current research evaluates the range of metrics, approaches and indicators for recognizing, protecting and advancing human rights in various environmental management contexts (e.g., species conservation, resource extraction, and payment for ecosystem services) and assesses the implications of these approaches for achieving rights integration. She also continues her long-term research on resource tenure, conservation-related displacement and resettlement, and resettlement compensation in Mozambique’s Limpopo National Park.