Honorary Professor, IRES
Munk School of Global Affairs, Professor
School of the Environment, Professor
Copenhagen Business School, Adjunct Professor

John Robinson is a Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs, and the School of the Environment, at the University of Toronto; an Honorary Professor with the Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability at The University of British Columbia; and an Adjunct Professor with the Copenhagen Business School, where he is leading the sustainability component of their campus redevelopment process. Prof. Robinson’s research focuses on the intersection of climate change mitigation, adaptation and sustainability; the use of visualization, modeling, and citizen engagement to explore sustainable futures; sustainable buildings and urban design; creating partnerships for sustainability with non-academic partners; and, generally, the intersection of sustainability, social and technological change, behaviour change, and community engagement processes. 

I am currently a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia and a Visiting Research Fellow in the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria. My current work focuses on management and governance of marine protected areas, adaptation of communities to climate change within the context of multiple stressors, and the use of participatory methodologies to facilitate adaptation.

Previously, I have worked as a researcher, university instructor, teacher, guide, international development worker, and sustainability-conservation educator. An environmental and social ethic shaped by lifelong explorations of wilderness areas and experiences working in diverse communities guides my work and research. My master’s research focused on the role of a Canadian national park in the social, cultural, political, and economic development of the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation of Lutsel K’e, Northwest Territories, Canada. My doctoral studies were supported by a Trudeau Scholarship and a SSHRC Joseph Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholar.

For more information and publications:


PhD Candidate
Liu Scholar
Four Year Fellowship Recipient

Research Interests: Agricultural landscapes, Development studies, Food security, Political ecology, Poverty alleviation, Resilience, Resource government and management, Sustainable intensification

Biography: Vincent Ricciardi is a PhD student in the department of Resource Management and Environmental Studies (RMES), Liu Scholar, and a UBC’s Four Year Fellowship recipient. Broadly, his research focuses on the intersection of sustainable agriculture, poverty alleviation, and land use change. Before attending UBC, he received his MSc degree in geography from Pennsylvania State University and worked as a research consultant throughout SE Asia and in Ghana. These experiences have allowed him to look at the larger processes surrounding food security issues and examine cross scale relationships. His dissertation research, supervised by Dr. Navin Ramankutty, is focused in India at the national, landscape, and farm scales to investigate: 1) What are the relationships between farm size, sustainability, and resilience? 2) What types of agricultural systems are viable in India’s future? 3) How do national and donor policies affect farm size and management practices?



Research Lab:

MA Student

Alida is a MA student in Resource Management and Environmental Studies working under the supervision of Dr. Terre Satterfield. Alida graduated with a double major in International Development Studies and Environment, Sustainability and Society from Dalhousie University.  Upon completing her undergraduate thesis on the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area and a placement at a conservation project in Zimbabwe, her interest in what constitutes effective conservation deepened. Her current research is in collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund Namibia, identifying wellbeing indicators in the communal conservancies of the Zambezi region. 

PhD Student
Public Scholar |Liu Scholar | Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Fellow | Olav Slaymaker Awardee

Helina is a PhD student at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. Her doctoral study at RES will be supervised by Dr.Terre Satterfield and Dr.Milind Kandlikar.She will be working on gender perceptions and valuation of ecosystem services among the Adivasi (indigenous communities of India) of Wayanad, Kerala, India. Her studies are supported by UBC Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, Olav Slaymaker Award, Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Award, International Tuition Award and Entrance Scholarship.

She is also founder of the project ‘The Everyday Nature‘ which aims to understand the perceptions of people towards nature. Prior to joining RES, Helina worked in India for nearly 6 years with Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change, Government of India (Link),Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ) (Link), Centre for Science and Environment (Link), Clinton Climate Initiative and Ennovent on various environment and development projects. At GIZ she supported TEEB (The Economics of Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity) India Initiative (Link).She volunteers at Boond (, which works to provide clean solar energy access to some of the poorest communities in India. At Boond she helps organize workshops and develop strategies for understanding the social and environmental impact of their projects.

Helina is a Commonwealth Scholar and graduate from London School of Economics and Political Science as well as a University First Rank holder from University of Delhi. She is native of Kerala (a beautiful coastal state in India) and loves Monsoon season. Mother of an extremely mischievous little boy and a strong advocate of women empowerment. Helina is a huge foodie and loves to paint in her spare time.

Contact:  |  | LinkedIn

PhD Student, Liu Scholar

Susanna’s research focuses on understanding the processes and dynamics that mediate food system sustainability, and the multi-functionality of farming systems. She uses interdisciplinary approaches to examine how context shapes the adoption of sustainable practices (the geography of sustainable agriculture), and how governance and policy interventions can facilitate more sustainable agroecological futures.

Her PhD work investigates how organic agriculture is contributing to food system sustainability by assessing the adoption of practices and approaches that enhance agro-ecosystem health and social welfare on organic farms in Canada. She is working with collaborating agencies to ground her research in the institutional context of the organic sector, and to ensure results are relevant to policy and regulatory discussions in Canada and globally. She is supervised by Hannah Wittman and Navin Ramankutty.

Susanna is as a member of the Food Secure Canada Board of Directors, an Advisor for the Meal Exchange Good Food Challenge, and an Articling Agrologist with the BC Institute of Agrologists. She has a BSc (honours) in Land Surface Processes and Environmental Change from McGill, and an MSc in Integrated Studies in Land and Food Systems from UBC. She has worked on the integration of climate change adaptation into programs and policies with the BC Ministry of Agriculture and the BC Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative. Many of these interests were first cultivated by her time working on small farms in Quebec, Oregon, and Latin America, and her work with campus food and sustainability initiatives at McGill University.

PhD Student, Liu Scholar

Rumi is a Ph.D. student in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES) at the University of British Columbia (UBC), focusing on behavioral psychology applied to conservation and natural resource management in tropical landscapes. She is also a Liu Scholar at the Liu Institute for Global Issues and a UBC’s Four Year Doctoral Fellowship recipient. Drawing on insights from cognitive psychology, her doctoral studies will investigate: 1) how land-users perceive conservation challenges differently and make subsequent land-use decisions; and 2) what interventions might facilitate desired behavioral change for sustainability.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies at UBC, Rumi worked with an Indonesia-based consulting firm, Starling Resources, as a senior project manager on a number of projects concerning collaborative land-use planning, forestry policies, reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), ecosystem restoration, sustainable peatland management, agroecology, and community-based economic development. She holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University in New York, with a focus on Environmental Policy Studies for Southeast Asia.

In her spare time, she enjoys training capoeira, traveling, hiking, and pottery.

PhD Candidate

Myriam completed her engineering degree in fisheries and environment at the National Agronomic Institute of Tunisia (INAT) in 2013. Just after her graduation, she joined the Sea Around Us as an intern, working on the catch reconstructions of certain Mediterranean and Arab countries. In 2014 Myriam started her MSc program in Resource Management and Environmental Studies (RMES), specializing in Fisheries, under the supervision of Prof. Daniel Pauly. In 2016, she transferred to the Ph.D. program. She is currently completing her Ph.D., thesis which focuses on the marine ecosystems and fisheries management in data-poor countries, mainly countries of the Southern Mediterranean and the Arabian Peninsula region.