People

Professor, IRES
Professor, Institute for Oceans and Fisheries

Kai is an interdisciplinary, problem-oriented sustainability scientist, trained in ecology, policy, and ethics from Princeton University and Stanford University. He strives to understand how social-ecological systems can be transformed to be both better and wilder. Kai leads CHANS lab (www.chanslab.ires.ubc.ca), Connecting Human and Natural Systems; he is a Leopold Leadership Program fellow, a director on the board of the BC chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), a director on the board of the North American section of the Society for Conservation Biology, a member of the Global Young Academy, a senior fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program, and (in 2012) the Fulbright Canada Visiting Research Chair at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Website: http://chanslab.ires.ubc.ca/people/chan/
Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=OByl3J0AAAAJ
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kai_Chan3

PhD Candidate

I am a PhD Candidate in the RMES program, working with Prof. Stephanie Chang. I finished my undergraduate studies in Urban and Regional Planning in Turkey. I did my masters at the University of Colorado Denver with concentration of Urban Place Making. Before starting my PhD at UBC, I worked as an Associate Planner, where I mainly focused on zoning, urban design, land development and land permitting projects.

My PhD research focuses on green infrastructure practices and climate change induced coastal disasters particularly in Canadian coasts. I am interested in how green infrastructure (G.I) effects adaption and resilience to potential coastal disasters and G.I’s applicability to communities along the Canadian coasts.

PhD Candidate

Jonathan Taggart is a PhD candidate studying with Drs. Terre Satterfield and Kai Chan whose research looks at the challenges in representing the traditional knowledge and land use of BC First Nations. Working closely with communities, he is interesting in the ways First Nations and allies might continue to express vibrant cultural practices in rights & title processes in ways that are both politically powerful and inclusive of diverse and dynamic human-nature interactions. Jonathan has taught visual-ethnographic methods at Emily Carr University and is Associate Faculty at Royal Roads University’s School of Communication & Culture. His feature-length ethnographic film,”Life Off Grid“, has screened at festivals and conferences internationally.

Jonathan is a UBC Public Scholar, a member of the Google Earth Outreach Trainers Network, and a founder of the Boreal Collective of Documentary Photographers. His research is supported by a SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Graduate Scholarship and a UBC Four-Year Fellowship.

MA Student

Alida is a MA student in Resource Management and Environmental Studies working under the supervision of Dr. Terre Satterfield. Alida graduated with a double major in International Development Studies and Environment, Sustainability and Society from Dalhousie University.  Upon completing her undergraduate thesis on the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area and a placement at a conservation project in Zimbabwe, her interest in what constitutes effective conservation deepened. Her current research is in collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund Namibia, identifying wellbeing indicators in the communal conservancies of the Zambezi region. 

MSc Student

Teddy is a first year MSc student in the Ecohydro Lab with an interest in water as a link between humans and the natural systems.

Teddy graduated with a BSE in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Princeton University in 2013, with a focus on urban stream restoration.  After graduation, Teddy pursued environmental engineering with an environmental consulting firm in the California Bay Area where he was involved in environmental site assessments, contaminant mapping, and groundwater monitoring.  He went on to join The Center for Watershed Sciences at UC Davis where he researched how hydrology drives montane meadow ecosystems in the Sierra and the amphibians living there.

When he’s not digging wells or monitoring streams, Teddy enjoys trail running, playing banjo, woodworking, or throwing the atlatl.

PhD Student
Liu Scholar | Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Fellow | Olav Slaymaker Awardee

Helina is a PhD student at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. Her doctoral study at RES will be supervised by Dr.Terre Satterfield and Dr.Milind Kandlikar.She will be working on gender perceptions and valuation of ecosystem services among the Adivasi (indigenous communities of India) of Wayanad, Kerala, India. Her studies are supported by UBC Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, Olav Slaymaker Award, Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Award, International Tuition Award and Entrance Scholarship.

She is also founder of the project ‘The Everyday Nature‘ which aims to understand the perceptions of people towards nature. Prior to joining RES, Helina worked in India for nearly 6 years with Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change, Government of India (Link),Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ) (Link), Centre for Science and Environment (Link), Clinton Climate Initiative and Ennovent on various environment and development projects. At GIZ she supported TEEB (The Economics of Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity) India Initiative (Link).She volunteers at Boond (www.boond.net), which works to provide clean solar energy access to some of the poorest communities in India. At Boond she helps organize workshops and develop strategies for understanding the social and environmental impact of their projects.

Helina is a Commonwealth Scholar and graduate from London School of Economics and Political Science as well as a University First Rank holder from University of Delhi. She is native of Kerala (a beautiful coastal state in India) and loves Monsoon season. Mother of an extremely mischievous little boy and a strong advocate of women empowerment. Helina is a huge foodie and loves to paint in her spare time.

Contact: helinajolly.ubc@gmail.com  | helinajolly@alumni.ubc.ca  | LinkedIn

I am a PhD Candidate working with co-supervision of Dr. Jiaying Zhao (Psychology/ IRES) and Dr. John Robinson (Munk School of Global Affairs U of T/ IRES). My research question is focused on what motivates pro-environmental behaviour change, with majority of projects concentrated in recycling and composting participation and accuracy. Additionally I’ve examined how education and engagement in nature (at UBC Botanical Gardens) impacts people’s ecological knowledge, willingness to act and connections with nature.

Theoretically I am synthesizing insights from environmental psychology, socio-cultural theories and complex systems thinking how various elements come together to form sustainability pathways over time. Key elements I focus on involve material artifacts (things and their use), motivation (culture, social norms, context) and knowledge (information, know-how, bodily performance). My research is supported by the SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship and the UBC 4 Year Fellowship.

Prior to coming to UBC I completed a Master’s of Environmental Studies at Queen’s University (Kingston, ON) and a B.A. from Carleton University (Ottawa, ON) in Environmental Studies (minor in Political Science). I love being involved in community/ campus sustainability: at UBC I worked as a Zero Waste Coordinator with Campus Sustainability & Community Planning for 2 years which provided me with valuable practical experience in rolling out campus-wide zero waste strategy.