Professor, IRES
Professor, School of Community and Regional Planning
Canada Research Chair (t2, Disaster Management and Urban Sustainability)

Dr. Stephanie Chang’s research addresses issues of community vulnerability and resilience to natural disasters. Broadly speaking, it investigates three types of questions: What happens in disasters, and why? What can be anticipated in future disasters? And, how can disruption from disasters be effectively reduced? Her work emphasizes economic, geographic, and planning aspects of risk and resilience at the urban scale. She is particularly interested in the role of urban infrastructure such as energy, water, and transportation systems. Dr. Chang has written extensively on socio-economic impacts of disasters, loss estimation models for critical infrastructure systems, infrastructure interdependencies, economic evaluation of disaster mitigations, urban disaster recovery, and long-term urban risk dynamics. She has conducted research on these topics in Canada, the U.S., Japan, New Zealand, and other places. Her current projects focus on coastal hazard risk and resilience in British Columbia. Dr. Chang has served on the U.S. National Research Council’s Committee on Disaster Research in the Social Sciences and its Committee on Earthquake Resilience ¬– Research, Implementation, and Outreach.

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Honorary Professor, IRES
Munk School of Global Affairs, Professor
School of the Environment, Professor
Copenhagen Business School, Adjunct Professor

John Robinson is a Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs, and the School of the Environment, at the University of Toronto; an Honorary Professor with the Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability at The University of British Columbia; and an Adjunct Professor with the Copenhagen Business School, where he is leading the sustainability component of their campus redevelopment process. Prof. Robinson’s research focuses on the intersection of climate change mitigation, adaptation and sustainability; the use of visualization, modeling, and citizen engagement to explore sustainable futures; sustainable buildings and urban design; creating partnerships for sustainability with non-academic partners; and, generally, the intersection of sustainability, social and technological change, behaviour change, and community engagement processes. 

PhD Student
Public Scholar |Liu Scholar | Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Fellow | Olav Slaymaker Awardee

Helina is a PhD student at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. Her doctoral study at RES will be supervised by Dr.Terre Satterfield and Dr.Milind Kandlikar.She will be working on gender perceptions and valuation of ecosystem services among the Adivasi (indigenous communities of India) of Wayanad, Kerala, India. Her studies are supported by UBC Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, Olav Slaymaker Award, Nehru Humanitarian Graduate Award, International Tuition Award and Entrance Scholarship.

She is also founder of the project ‘The Everyday Nature‘ which aims to understand the perceptions of people towards nature. Prior to joining RES, Helina worked in India for nearly 6 years with Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change, Government of India (Link),Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ) (Link), Centre for Science and Environment (Link), Clinton Climate Initiative and Ennovent on various environment and development projects. At GIZ she supported TEEB (The Economics of Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity) India Initiative (Link).She volunteers at Boond (, which works to provide clean solar energy access to some of the poorest communities in India. At Boond she helps organize workshops and develop strategies for understanding the social and environmental impact of their projects.

Helina is a Commonwealth Scholar and graduate from London School of Economics and Political Science as well as a University First Rank holder from University of Delhi. She is native of Kerala (a beautiful coastal state in India) and loves Monsoon season. Mother of an extremely mischievous little boy and a strong advocate of women empowerment. Helina is a huge foodie and loves to paint in her spare time.

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PhD Candidate

Nicolas Talloni is a very patient student in Resource Management and Environmental Studies eager to complete his PhD sooner than later. Nicolas’s research is focused on the current and potential impacts of climate change on fisheries economics, and adaptation strategies of coastal communities. Nicolas is working under the supervision of Dr. Rashid Sumaila (Fisheries Economics Research Unit, IOF), Dr. William Cheung (Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program, IOF ), and Dr. Philippe Le Billon (Faculty of Geography, Liu Institute).


PhD Student

Anthony is a PhD student and community development practitioner, broadly interested in the ways in which Indigenous communities access, control and utilize territorial resources for culturally appropriate and sustainable community economic development.

Anthony has a BA honours in history from York University, and a masters in human and economic geography from the University of Victoria. Anthony has lived and worked in various countries in West Africa and Latin America and he is fluent in Spanish and French. Currently his geographic focus is in British Columbia, where he is working closely with non-governmental and First Nation partners. When he is not working with communities and doing research, Anthony puts his time into surfing, writing and making music. 

PhD Student

Tim is a first-year PhD student studying fisheries economics under the supervision of Rashid Sumaila. Tim’s research at IRES and the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries will continue to work on the Fish Tracker Initiative to link investors to sustainable and unsustainable fisheries practices. Through this research, Tim hopes to better evaluate the risk of current fisheries overexploitation and the declining returns to those invested in them.

Tim received a double major BA from Huron University College at the University of Western Ontario. Tim began his fisheries research during his master’s at Dalhousie University focusing on the environmental and ecological impacts of reduction fisheries and seafood life cycle assessment.

Recently, Tim has worked for the Sea Around Us at UBC working on various projects including fish used for fishmeal and fish oil, analyzing trends in fisheries discards, and researching global fisheries gear use. He hopes this research can help to understand the impacts of fisheries on marine ecosystems and their role in sustainable food production. Tim’s research is funded by a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship, and the UBC 4-Year Fellowship.

M.Sc Candidate


Nathan grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee in the valley of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.  His interests in marine life started from reading books and watching documentaries as a kid.  He earned his Open Water Certification while in high school and spent 3 weeks diving off of Baja Mexico in 11th grade reaffirming his passion in the ocean environment. He earned a B.A. in Marine Affairs and Policy from the University of Miami in 2015.  As a student, his research focused on marine conservation efforts and the numerous issues around global fisheries.  He spent 6 months in Miami working for the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration after graduation, looking into the relation between management measures and landed value of commercial fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico.  Nathan started his Master’s degree here in the Institute of Resources, Environment, and Sustainability in the fall of 2016, working for Rashid Sumaila in the Fisheries Economic Research Unit.  His research primarily focuses on conducting an economic analysis of a BC wide genomic-study of Coho salmon that aims to more effectively identify different conservation units of Coho as they are caught, to redirect pressure off of vulnerable stocks in mixed-stock fisheries.  

Ph.D. Student

Isaac Jonas is Ph.D. student with the Institute of the Oceans and Fisheries (IOF) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He started off as a Research Assistant to Dr U. Rashid Sumaila through the FERU/OceanCanada of the IOF. He has been working on an OceanCanada Partnership project that involves designing a Sustainability Fisheries Insurance Fund (SIF) for the small pelagic fluctuating fish stock like the Peruvian anchoveta. Isaac holds a Master of Food and Resource Economics (MFRE) degree from UBC, where he graduated as a valedictorian and a MasterCard Foundation Scholarship holder. He earned his BSc honors degree in Economics from the University of Zimbabwe. On his spare time, he works with Impact Africa Trust, a Not-for Profit Organization (NGO) that he co-founded in 2015. The NGO does work in Zimbabwe to equip young farmers with 21st century skills. A global citizen, Isaac has spoken at various local and international forums, for example, the Skoll World Forum at the Said Business School, Oxford University and the UBC African Business Forum.

PhD Student

I am a Peruvian researcher that has been studying the ecological and human dimensions of the Humboldt Current in Peru, with emphasis on fisheries economics and governance. Before joining the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries at the University of British Columbia as a graduate student, I worked  as associate researcher at Centre for Environmental Sustainability of the Cayetano Heredia University in Peru (2010-2015), and at Inteligencia Financiera SAC (2014-2015); as consultant for OCEANA-Peru (2016), the GEF-UNDP Project: “Towards the ecosystem based management of the Humboldt Current Large Marine Ecosystem” (2013-2015), the Peruvian Ministry of Production (2014), the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment (2013), and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2013); and, as fisheries advisor to the Vice-Minister of Fisheries at the Peruvian Ministry of Production (2012).

My research interests include: (i) seafood value chains, (ii) ecological modelling, (iii) marine and fisheries governance, (iv) ecosystem-based fisheries management, (v) economic valuation of ecosystem services, (vi) small-scale fisheries, (vii) fisheries economics, (viii) fisheries law, (ix) reduction fisheries, (x) rights-based management.