Director, IRES
Professor, IRES
Professor, Liu Institute for Global Issues

Milind Kandlikar (PhD Carnegie Mellon) is a Professor at the Liu Institute for Global Issues and the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. His work focuses on the intersection of technology innovation, human development and the global environment. Dr. Kandlikar’s current projects include the regulation of agricultural biotechnology including implications for food security; air quality in Indian cities; risks and benefits of nanotechnology; solar lighting systems in the developing world; and development and climate change. He has also published extensively on the science and policy of climate change.

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Professor, IRES

Dr. Gunilla Öberg is inspired by her deep knowledge in chlorine biogeochemistry, environment and sustainability, and her experience as a leader of complex interdisciplinary research and education. Her recent projects address sustainable sanitation planning, particularly in growing urban areas. Questions that drive her work include: What kind of knowledge is needed, used and trusted? How does the knowledge used impact perceived solutions and how are risks and benefits distributed? Research of late involves land-application of biosolids/sewage sludge, contaminants of emerging concern and sustainable sanitation solutions for informal urban settlements. Dr. Öberg also pursues innovations in science education including how to: learn/teach science while recognizing its limits; internalize ideas about bias, uncertainty and ignorance; and distinguish between absence of proof versus proof of absence. Her new pedagogy initiatives include directing UBC’s “First Year Seminar in Science” and developing “Sustainability for the Community and the World”, a 4th year capstone course in UBC’s emerging sustainability concentrations.

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Honorary Professor, IRES
Munk School of Global Affairs, Professor
School of the Environment, Professor
Copenhagen Business School, Adjunct Professor

John Robinson is a Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs, and the School of the Environment, at the University of Toronto; an Honorary Professor with the Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability at The University of British Columbia; and an Adjunct Professor with the Copenhagen Business School, where he is leading the sustainability component of their campus redevelopment process. Prof. Robinson’s research focuses on the intersection of climate change mitigation, adaptation and sustainability; the use of visualization, modeling, and citizen engagement to explore sustainable futures; sustainable buildings and urban design; creating partnerships for sustainability with non-academic partners; and, generally, the intersection of sustainability, social and technological change, behaviour change, and community engagement processes. 

PhD Candidate

I am a PhD Candidate in the RMES program, working with Prof. Stephanie Chang. I finished my undergraduate studies in Urban and Regional Planning in Turkey. I did my masters at the University of Colorado Denver with concentration of Urban Place Making. Before starting my PhD at UBC, I worked as an Associate Planner, where I mainly focused on zoning, urban design, land development and land permitting projects.

My PhD research focuses on green infrastructure practices and climate change induced coastal disasters particularly in Canadian coasts. I am interested in how green infrastructure (G.I) effects adaption and resilience to potential coastal disasters and G.I’s applicability to communities along the Canadian coasts.

I am currently a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia and a Visiting Research Fellow in the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria. My current work focuses on management and governance of marine protected areas, adaptation of communities to climate change within the context of multiple stressors, and the use of participatory methodologies to facilitate adaptation.

Previously, I have worked as a researcher, university instructor, teacher, guide, international development worker, and sustainability-conservation educator. An environmental and social ethic shaped by lifelong explorations of wilderness areas and experiences working in diverse communities guides my work and research. My master’s research focused on the role of a Canadian national park in the social, cultural, political, and economic development of the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation of Lutsel K’e, Northwest Territories, Canada. My doctoral studies were supported by a Trudeau Scholarship and a SSHRC Joseph Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholar.

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PhD Student

Hello! My name is Johnnie James Manson. I am from the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation (a Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation located on the West-coast of Vancouver Island). I am an incoming PhD student under the supervision of Dr. Terre Satterfield and Dr. Hannah Wittman.
My current research will be broadly looking at the nexus between Indigenous identities, land-based practices, Indigenous food sovereignty, Indigenous cultural, social, and economic service providers, and neoliberalism. To do this, I will be conducting an engaged research process with the BCFSN WGIFS and Indigenous communities of British Columbia.
Most of my work experience has centered on natural resources. I have worked in the salmon aquaculture industry (1999-2007), as a stewardship technician with the British Columbia Conservation Corps (2008), as an environmental technician with the Ktunaxa Lands and Resources Agency (2010), and as fisheries technician with Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council (2011). I have also worked extensively as a private tutor for sociology and anthropology students.

Currently, I work with the BC Food Systems Network (BCFSN) Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty (WGIFS), focusing on revitalization of Indigenous trading routes in British Columbia.
I hold a Bachelor of Arts (With Distinction), Joint Major in Sociology and Anthropology, from Simon Fraser University (2013). I also have a technical diploma in Fisheries and Aquaculture (2006) from Vancouver Island University.

My research passions are varied and many, and include (but are not limited to): Indigenous worldviews, Indigenous research paradigms, decolonizing methodologies, critical theory, environmental co-management, and continental philosophy.
I really like: hiking, punk rock, indie music, all types of other music, my culture, my family, and all types of boring (but useful!) theory.